Tuesday, August 16, 2011

How Do YOU Do A Con?

As I noted the other day, the S.O. and I hit Wizard World Chicago this weekend. I don't think I'll elaborate on the details of the show as I think there are better summaries out there already. As I said, though, I had a good time and picked up some good books.

BUT!

I left the con feeling like I could have done it better. It's actually a feeling I have after pretty much every comic convention I've been to: I always feel like I could have done it better and gotten more out of it. Doesn't matter if I've been there for the whole show or just a couple hours; if I found great bargains in the quarter bins or some rare treasure that blew my budget or nothing at all; if I attended a bunch of panels or none at all; if I liked the creators in attendance or not; if I met friends at the show or was just by myself... It seems that regardless of what I do at a convention, even if I enjoy myself a great deal, I leave with the nagging feeling that I could've done it better. Taken more advantage of being around thousands of other comic book fans. Like I should walk away from every show thinking, "WOW! THAT WAS THE BEST TIME EVER!" instead of, "Yeah, I had a good time."

Granted, not every show is going to be a winner and some are just legitimately bad. But I get the feeling that I'm doing something wrong. Or rather, not doing something right that I should be doing.

So, let me put this question out to everyone: what do you do at a convention to make it as awesome as possible? What makes a con really, really excellent for you? How do you do a con?

2 comments:

Tor Hershman said...

)))(((((
(-)...(-)
....U....
.[____].---{'How,' I ain't sure but moi 'tis sure of "A" what and when.}

Matt K said...

I have not gone to many, but let's see. I went to a couple with a friend, and that added a lot to the fun.

Otherwise, I look around. I like to explore the aisles of the indy creators because I always find something nifty which I hadn't realized existed.

I bargain hunt, of course.

I like taking things to get signed, because it's a fun excuse to meet people and maybe chat with them briefly. I've found that if you put some thought/originality into what you bring to have signed, instead of just their best-known work which they'll sign 200 times that day, it can spur an interesting remark or two.

I don't go to panels. The format doesn't appeal much to me nor does the necessity of keeping track of the time and interrupting whatever else I'm doing to go find Hall C room 12. Panels are obviously a highlight for many; that they don't do much for me may be one reason I don't get excited about going to cons very often these days.