Who's Appeared In Comic Book Movies The Most?

By | Tuesday, June 25, 2013 Leave a Comment
Random question that I've kicked around from time to time. Which actor(s) has appeared the most in movies and TV shows that were based on comic books and/or comic strips? Here's some candidates I've thought of...

Noel Neill appeared in the 1948 and 1950 Superman movies as Lois Lane, as well as in the subsequent TV show. She's also appeared as other characters in the 1978 and 2006 Superman movies, and The Adventures of Superboy television series.

Chris Evans
is racking up a resume of movies. Two Fantastic Four films, two Captain America films, The Avengers, the 2007 TMNT movie, The Losers, Scott Pilgrim, and Snowpiercer to date with another Avengers movie coming down the pipe.

Doug Jones doesn't have the star power of Evans, but he's showed up in two Hellboy theatrical release and two TV movies, Men in Black II, Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer, Mystery Men and a third Hellboy feature film has been announced.

Hugh Jackman is, of course, really the only version of Wolverine most people know. He's appeared as the character in five X-Men films that have been released and two more that are being worked on now.

Scarlet Johansson, before appearing as Black Widow in Iron Man 2 and The Avengers, played Rebecca in Ghost World and Silken Floss in The Spirit. She voiced Veronica Lodge in an episode of Robot Chicken. She's scheduled to return to her role as Black Widow in Captain America: The Winter Soldier and The Avengers 2.

Samuel L. Jackson has shown up in five Marvel movies as Nick Fury, with another three allegedly on the slate. He also appeared in The Spirit and lent his voice to Astro Boy (2009), The Boondocks and Afro Samurai.

Adam West, the iconic Batman of the 1960s, appeared in both the TV show and feature film of that era. He provided the voice of Hercules in the 1976 Shazam! show, and returned as the voice of Batman in The New Adventures of Batman and SuperFriends cartoons. He's also lent his talents to cameos in other TV shows, including Batman: The Animated Series, Lois & Clark, Weird Science, The Boondocks, The Batman (2004 series), The Brave and the Bold, and The Super Hero Squad Show.

Frank Welker is pretty exclusive to voice acting, but he's got one hell of a credits list! Super Friends, The All-New Popeye Hour, The Fantastic Four (1978), Casper and the Angels, The New Shmoo, Heathcliff, The Ri¢hie Ri¢h/Scooby-Doo Show, Ziggy's Gift, Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends, Lucky Luke, Smurfs, Superman (1988), Beetle Bailey, Marvin: Baby of the Year, This Is America, Charlie Brown, Blondie & Dagwood: Second Wedding Workout, A Wish for Wings That Work, Fish Police, Batman: The Animated Series, The Savage Dragon, The Mask (1995), Superman (1996), Batman Beyond, Static Shock, The Batman (2005), plus various iterations of Garfield cartoons and probably a few dozen other things I'm missing.

Stan Lee is more well-known for writing superheroes, but he's been doing cameos for decades. After a stint as the narrator on Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends and The Incredible Hulk cartoons from the 1980s, he's popped up in The Trial of the Incredible Hulk; the Spider-Man, Hulk, and FF cartoons from the 1990s; the 2004, 2009 and 2012 Spider-Man cartoons; Avengers Assemble!; and the spate of Marvel movies from the past decade including X-Men, Spider-Man, Daredevil, Hulk, Spider-Man 2, Fantastic Four, X-Men: The Last Stand, Spider-Man 3, Fantastic 4: Rise of the Silver Surfer, Iron Man, Iron Man 2, Thor, Captain America: The First Avenger, The Avengers, and The Amazing Spider-Man. Plus, there's a good chance he'll show up in The Amazing Spider-Man 2, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, and Thor: The Dark World.

The interesting thing, then, is how you define "the most". Lee certainly has a long list of credits to his name, but they're almost all limited to appearances of only a few seconds. Evans has had starring roles in nine feature films. And then there's Welker with a ton of significant roles, but all of them behind the camera. Which is more salient? More importantly, who have I missed that's got more than three or four credits to their name?
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